Sunday, May 22, 2011

The "Summer of Cloud Computing" Begins...

On June 6-9, when the doors to Cloud Expo New York open at the Jacob Javits Center, IT infrastructure and operations professionals from around the world will be able to see with their own eyes that the "Summer of Cloud Computing" has well and truly begun.

With company participation from every level of the cloud computing ecosystem and a non-stop, 4-day technical program, Cloud Expo New York features expert speakers from every top Cloud player, including Abiquo, Amazon, Amplidata, AppZero, Aprimo, AT&T, Backupify, CA Technologies, Capgemini, Cbeyond, CiRBA, Cisco, City of Portland,,, Cloud9, CloudSwitch, CodeFutures, Dell, Dell Boomi, Desktone, Eucalyptus Systems, FastIgnite, Fiorano, Full360, Fusion-io, Global Digital Forensics, GoGrid, Google, HP, HyTrust, IBM, iGATE Patni, Impetus, Interactive Intelligence, Interxion, KPMG, KuppingerCole, Layered Technologies, Layer7, LogLogic, McAfee, Microsoft, MIT,, Mycroft, National Reconnaissance Office, NetDialog, The New York Times, NJVC, NYSERDA, OpSource, Oracle, OutSystems, OxygenCloud, Parabon, PayPal, PerspecSys, Ping Identity, Pitney Bowes, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Quest Software, Racemi, Rackspace, Red Hat, RightScale, Rise Partners, Riverbed Technology, Robust Cloud, Roundarch, Servoy, SnapAppointments, Spoon, Stoneware, Sybase, Telx, 1010data, Terremark, Trend Micro, UShareSoft, Virtela, VMware, Voxel, WidePoint, Xiotech, Yahoo!, Zapthink, Zetta and Zeus Technology.

On the Expo Floor, with over 100 booths, leading technology solutions providers will be showcasing a welter of technologies aimed at making cloud computing reliable, stable and manageable for customers large and small.

The quality of the speakers is best evidenced by the fact that they include:

  • Co-Founder and CTO of Dell Boomi - Rick Nucci
  • President of Dell Services - Steve Schuckenbrock
  • CEO of Abiquo - Pete Malcolm
  • CEO & Co-Founder at RightScale - Michael Crandell
  • Sr. VP of the Application Platform Division at VMware - Rod Johnson
  • CTO of Rackspace - John Engates
  • CEO of Backupify - Rob May
  • CEO & Founder of GoGrid - John Keagy
  • CTO of Worldwide Services at Microsoft - Norm Judah
  • Group VP of Software Cloud Strategy for Oracle Fusion Applications - Chris Leone
  • VP of Global Cloud Computing at Yahoo! - Todd Papaioannou
  • Technology Evangelist at Amazon - Jinesh Varia
  • Developer Advocate at Google - Chris Schalk
  • Sr. Software Engineer at IBM - Doug Tidwell
  • Director, Cloud Global Practice at HP Enterprise Business - Marc Wilkinson
  • CIO of the National Reconnaissance Office - Jill T. Singer
  • CTO at PayPal - Scott Guilfoyle
  • CTO & Co-Founder of Eucalyptus Systems - Rich Wolski
  • Sr. Director of Cloud Platforms at Red Hat - Tobias Kunze
  • Co-Founder & CEO at OpSource - Treb Ryan
  • VP, Cloud Services at Terremark - Bill Lowry
  • CEO of FastIgnite - Simeon Simeonov
  • CTO & Co-founder of UShareSoft - James Weir
  • Advisor Lean IT & Cloud Computing at CA Technologies - Gregor Petri
  • Distinguished System Engineer at Cisco - Jim French
  • Sr. Mgr. of SaaS Products & Cloud Solutions at HP - Neil Ashizawa
  • CTO McAfee Content & Cloud at McAfee - Scott Chasi
  • Business Development Director at Oracle - Arturo Pereyra
  • Co-Founder of CloudCamp - Dave Nielsen
  • Director at KPMG - Bhargav Shah
  • Sr. VP of CRM at Oracle - Anthony Lye
  • CTO & Chief Architect at Layer 7 Technologies - K. Scott Morrison
  • Partner Engineering Consultant at Spoon - Lee Murphy
  • CTO of Sybase - Irfan Khan
  • CTO of Vordel - Mark O'Neill
  • CEO of AppZero - Greg O'Connor
  • Founder & CEO of Oxygen Cloud - Peter Chang
  • VP of Cloud Architecture & Services at Virtela - Ron Haigh
  • Co-Founder & CEO of Fusion-io - David Flynn
  • Co-Founder of The Rackspace Cloud - Rackspace
  • President at Layered Technologies - Brad Hokamp
  • SVP of Facilities Engineering at Terremark - Ben Stewart
  • Founder/CTO of PerspecSys - Terry Woloszyn
  • CISO for the City of Portland - Logan Kleier
  • Co-Founder & CTO of - Rik Arends
  • Engineering Fellow with NJVC - Kevin Jackson
  • Founder & CEO, Parabon Computation - Steve Armentrout
  • Managing Partner at ZapThink - Jason Bloomberg
  • Sr. Sales Engineer at Eucalyptus Systems - Paul Weiss
  • CEO of Servoy - Jan Aleman
  • VP of Product Marketing at Oracle - Rex Wang
  • Global Director for Global Application Outsourcing at Capgemini - Mark Skilton
  • CTO at Ping Identity - Patrick Harding
  • Corporate Business Development at Zeus Technology - Raja Srinivasan
  • Technical Leader in the Office of the CTO at Riverbed Technology - Steve Riley
  • Product Development Lead at Rackspace - Josh Odom
  • Co-Founder, CEO & CTO at Stoneware - Rick German
  • VP of Community at - Mark Hinkle
  • Software Manager at The New York Times - Paul Robbins
  • Chief Solution Architect at Desktone - Danny Allan
  • Director of Advanced Technology & Products for Quest Software - Thomas Bryant
  • Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers - Brian Butte
  • Java EE and GlassFish Evangelist at Oracle - Arun Gupta
  • President & Co-Founder of HyTrust - Eric Chiu
  • CTO & SVP, Operations at OpSource - John Rowell
  • Co-Founder of KuppingerCole - Tim Cole
  • Product Manager in the Cloud Division at Rackspace Hosting - Megan Wohlford
  • Communications Director at Interxion - Jelle Frank
  • Co-Founder of 1Plug Corporation - Penelope Everall Gordon
  • Founder at SnapAppointments - Cody Harris
  • Co-Founder of CiRBA - Andrew Hillier
  • Co-Founder of SnapAppointments - Brock Holzer
  • Director of Integration Solutions for Aprimo - Amelia Ross
  • Executive VP at LogLogic - Bill Roth
  • VP Engineering at NetDialog - Tim Rühl
  • Developer, Web Services JBoss/Red Hat - Anil Saldhana
  • Vice President, Products at Zetta - Chris Schin
  • CIO, Enterprise Business Partners - Pradip Sitaram
  • Sr. Director of Engineering and R&D at Impetus Technologies - Vineet Tyagi
  • 2011 Instructor at Cloud Computing Bootcamp - Larry Carvalho
  • Business Development Manager at - Lieke Arends

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Social Comparison Engine Meets Cloud Computing & PaaS

One can add the word "social" to any other word in the English language right now, and somewhere, sometime, a group of software developers will turn the colloquy into some kind of a website or application.

Take "social" + "comparison" for example.

In 2006, whileon maternity leave, French-born Vanina Berger (pictured) - a senior software engineer - wanted to compare unusual things such as the best place to give birth. Realizing that it was not so easy to find comparison tables about things that were not products to sell, she began wondering if perhaps what was needed was a comparison engine, a tool that allowed one to collaborate with others to maintain a matrix with a lot of interesting details, advanced criteria such as ratings, etc. In short it would be very nice to have a generic, collaborative and social tool that helps everyone to create easily comparisons...about ANYTHING.

Vanina's partner Alexis Fruhinsholz found the idea interesting and started to work on the project at the end of 2008. The result was, a site I'd not heard of until the team behind it reached out to me yesterday to ask if I'd like to use it to conduct a comparative survey of PaaS/Cloud services.

The results are below. Let me know what you think about as an application. I am certainly intrigued.

Saturday, April 2, 2011

Are We Social-Networking Ourselves To Poverty?

So James Franco has declared that 'Social Media Is Over' and done the unthinkable...he has shut down his Twitter account.

Will the world stop spinning? Is this the end of western civilization? What next, will people stop asking questions on Quora, will they cease to publish photos on Facebook, will we see the end of Skype-messaging? Worst of all, might the long-awaited Godot known as "Enterprise 2.0" now never turn up?

Well I have news for us all: Franco may be righter than he knows.

It is not that Social Media Is Dead, however. It is that "Social Media" itself is too fanciful a term, right up there with "Social Shopping."

Personally I am not convinced that Twitter is primarily a social medium, I see it more as a collaboration tool that has been momentarily sidelined and become stereotyped in its usage despite its infinite applicability.

But then that is the curse of "Social" - the word has a track record of bogging down all that it engulfs.

One example. I am so ancient that when I first studied "Social" and Political Science at Cambridge, there wasn't even a Social Science faculty, my degree course was affiliated to the Committee of Social & Political Science. Adding the word "Social" to science, back in the day, was akin to adding the word "Fair" to trade. People smelled a rat!

Now it gets added to anything and everything, so that we have the Social Graph, we have Social Data, and we even have Social Authority. But the mother and father of all the "Social" colloquies remains "Social Media."

Let's see whether James Franco's move this week triggers a debate as to whether we are not about to see a correction in the international marketplace of ideas, a retrenchment from the strangely misguided notion that the hand the writes the most Tweets rules the world.

No wonder China is out-pacing the U.S. on so many metrics of productivity and economic progress: according to Nielsen, social networking now accounts for 22% of all time spent online in the U.S.

Friday, December 3, 2010

WikiLeaks & Web 3.0 - What Does Cablegate Teach Us About Cloud Computing & the New Web?

Is Web 3.0 maybe going to be less the utopia we've been envisaging and more like the real, physical world, with all the real-world limitations that follow along with it...?

The latest WikiLeaks ("Cablegate") affair, coming as it does at the very end of the first decade of the 21st Century, comes at an appropriate moment.

An undoubted political and diplomatic hornet's nest, the swirling discussions surrounding the organization's drip-drip release of (so far) 612 of the quarter of a million or so diplomatic cables in its possession are all grist to the mill of an "awakening" that in my view clearly imho going to mark the difference between the Web of 2000-1010 and that of 2011 onwards.

Viewing the world through the prism of Cloud Computing may seem to many to be a little arcane, but actually it is highly à propos. Because the same people who are failing to suppress the WikiLeaks documents are also in charge of U.S. cybersecurity in general. So one crucial thing we have learned if for a moment we leave to one side the ethics or un-ethics of making the cables public is that, if the rumors/allegations are true, a certain US private Bradley Manning somehow obtained access to far too *much* information for someone of his rank, in one go, before we even go into the question of its potential political and diplomatic sensitivity.

 PAUL FREMANTLE (pictured) has been very outspoken about this. "I place the blame directly on a lack of Governance and poor IT systems," he writes, adding:

"And the measures that have so far been announced - things like removing CD drives from classified systems - are simply the wrong approach. The real problem is why any one person - whatever level of clearance they had - should have access to all 250,000 cables."

Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer at WSO2, Fremantle chairs the OASIS WS-RX TC that is standardizing WSRM. He knows his way around XACML, too - eXtensible Access Control Markup Language, a declarative access control policy language implemented in XML - and offers this piece of technical advice to the powers that be:

"Without going into the details of XACML and policy-based entitlement models, suffice it to say that the right approach is to base access not only on the person, but the reason they have for accessing the data. Using policy-based entitlement, it is possible to have a well-defined Governance model where a person is given access to just the right data at just the right time for just the right purpose, and that this can be managed in a process-driven, auditable and controlled manner."

But let us move from the question of the original security breach itself to the broader questions that have been snowballing since, as the authorities have sought to shut stable door after stable door, even while the rest of the Net-savvy world was fully aware that the horse would be on its way to a country like Switzerland.

Door #1 was slammed shut thanks to Amazon Web Services.

Door #2 was closed by

Door #3 was shut by Tableau Software - well, more of a skylight really.

But the very nature of distributed computing is such that "doors" can be closed ad infinitum with very little effect on the flow of information through the system.

 As Java expert and Cloud Computing pioneer ALAN WILLIAMSON (pictured) puts it: "ThePirateBay is a classic example of a site that just won't die they have even tried jailing the founders, yet it still happily serves up content every day, growing daily."

As Williamson points out:

"They keep moving their content to secure locations, and keep aligning themselves with bandwidth suppliers who believe in net neutrality."

ThePirateBay though is not cloud-related. In the case of WikiLeaks, it is. When Amazon's AWS team pulled the plug on its service to WikiLeaks citing Terms of Service breaches WikiLeaks had to scramble fast and suffered an outage.

"I think this highlights how important cloud neutrality is," says Williamson. "Vendor lock-in is now a major issue. How quickly can I move my enterprise to another vendor? Do I have to align myself with the political viewpoints of my cloud vendor in order to ensure a happy co-existence?"

This is merely a hoster-client relationship problem that existed long before the likes of Amazon/Google/Rackspace got into the cloud-hosting game, Williams reminds us. If your ISP didn't like what you published, they could turn you off. They were under the gun of their upstream bandwidth supplier too. So there was always accountability.

But for Williamson there is a bigger consideration:

"The Internet is open, we have to embrace that. I for one, am proud there are secure silos around the world that can host material and get it out to the people. Yes we have to take the rough with the smooth, and while we do not agree with what they publish, if we live in a free society then this is what we have to swallow if I am to be able to stand up to be heard without fear.

The Internet can keep governments honest...or at least more honest than historically allowed. We have to keep things open."

As WS02's Paul Fremantle expresses it:

"Here is a situation where the world’s biggest superpower wants to have a website erased from the face of the Web. Who will prevail? Given the distributed nature of the Internet, I know
where my money is."

 STOWE BOYD, self-declared social philosopher and "webthropologist," takes Williamson's "We have to keep things open" stance to another level.

"What WikiLeaks represents is civil disobedience channeled through an agenda of radical openness," declares Boyd.

"The individuals involved on a personal level are deciding that laws that may or may not designate their activities as illegal are illegitimate, that our obedience to the state is coerced, and therefore can be morally opposed and countered."

Boyd goes on to explain this in more detail as follows:

"Wikileaks is an example of direct action, like Greenpeace activists attempting to shut down the Knightsnorth power station, claiming that the laws against trespass and destruction of private property were outweighed by the need to counter global warming to prevent far greater property damage around the world. They were acquitted, the first time such a claim was used as a 'lawful excuse' for committing a crime (see

One form of "direct action," Boyd continues, is to expose secrets, especially when governments or large corporations are saying one thing publicly and doing another clandestinely.

"In some cases these exposés might involve criminal wrong-doing, or simply duplicitous behavior," says Boyd.

"Amazon or other hosting providers that opt to decline support for WikiLeaks or other activists may be acting because of alternate moral viewpoints, or through coercion, or fears of future repercussions when governments may decide that the hosts are culpable in some way," he adds.

For Boyd, we need WikiLeaks to be strengthened, not abolished or suppressed.

"I think ultimately WikiLeaks should become a global non-profit like Greenpeace, specifically organized to accomplish certain goals for the sake of the world, like exposing who is funding political action when laws allow it to be concealed (as in the US), or exposing the inner workings of unregulated or barely regulated industries.

For example, it would have been great to have known prior to the Deepwater disaster how lax the regulatory agencies were, and how great the risks were. Had some whistle blowers disclosed that information to WikiLeaks, and it had been made public, we might have averted the disaster.

The world needs an omsbudsman, and the UN is not the answer, because it is used a tool of nationalist politics by the member countries. It is theater, not a check on the nations excesses.

We need WikiLeaks not necessarily as currently configured, and not necessarily Julian Assange in control of it but we need something like it to exist, as a counter to the architects of power."

In a follow-up note Boyd pointed out that, since WikiLeaks is already an international non-profit, what he meant was that it should be organized like Greenpeace, as a federation of non-profits in the various countries, supported by activists in the member countries.

"WikiLeaks is not organized in that fashion today, and it should be," Boyd asserts.

If you accept which many commentators evidently do not! that someone can support the idea of government transparency outside of the context of the binary view of "conservative" or "liberal," then the Cablegate affair seemingly confirms the contention that the more secretive a government is, the less it serves the people. Because otherwise why are there so many ordinary law-abiding people, and not just Julian Assange's lawyer, whose hackles have been raised by the attempt to apprehend him and shutter his organization once and for all?

No fewer than 511,205 people "like" the WikiLeaks Official Facebook Page, and between 3AM and 11AM eastern time this morning, the #WikiLeaks hash tag WAS used in more than 7,304 new tweets on Twitter.

Let us not forget either that five news groups accepted the chance to be the first to republish cables from the WikiLeaks cable-horde - The Guardian, The New York Times, Der Spiegel, Le Monde and El Pais. These are not underground radical pamphlets, these are world-class newspapers. It seems unlikely that Joe Lieberman's staffers will be telephoning them all asking them to close down the presses.

I am going to give the last word (for the moment, anyway) to the BBC. Or, rather, to BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellen-Jones. Without taking sides on whether or not AWS had discontinued its service to WikiLeaks because of pressure from American politicians - for the simple reason that "I've tried repeatedly over the last 24 hours to speak to the firm, with no success" - Cellan-Jones wrote a piece published this morning on the BBC's news site on the subject of what he called "the end of web innocence." Here was how he concluded the article:

"The innocent days when young web firms could pretend that they were simply agents of free expression based on neutral technology seem to be coming to an end. They have grown up into giant media empires, so they can expect every lobbyist, every politician and every pressure group to want to shape the way they do business."

What do you think? Let me know via Twitter (@jg21) or in the Feedback form below.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Why Blogging is Not a True Co-Technology

Speaking today in Tokyo at The New Context Conference 2010, the founder of Twitter, Biz Stone (pictured), put onto the record two sentences that will stand the test of time in the era of social computing:

"Twitter isn't a triumph of technology it's a triumph of humanity. A more connected world leads to a more empathic world."

Interestingly, Stone makes this observation in the self-same week that saw the sale of TechCrunch, Inc. to New York-based AOL - triggering a spate of commentaries along the lines of This Is the Death of Independent Blogging.

Is this an inflexion point? Hell, yes. And a big one. This week is also the week in which, as Guy Kawasaki reminds us, that Twitter's traffic overtook that of MySpace.

So what is going on? Why is independent blogging being characterized as dying at the very moment that tweeting is becoming as natural a part of the interconnected world as breathing?

The key, I believe, is in that word "ïnterconnected" - because blogging, for all its merits, has always suffered from that one huge shortcoming, namely that (notwithstanding the excellent innovations like RSS, Trackbacks, the Technorati real-time APIs and even Google's Blog Search) it truly isn't very interactive. I blog, you blog, he/she/it blogs. We hyperlink to each other, but that is about it. Blog feedback threads are frustratingly isolated silos. In fact, to be blunt, blogging is about as innovative a use of the Web as propping open your office door with a Xitami web server.

Tweeting, in contrast, is quite another pair of shoes. Twitter is a true co-technology. And only co-technologies will truly flourish, in the second decade of the 21st century.

Biz Stone is right: "A more connected world leads to a more empathic world." That is after all one of the pillars of co-intelligence, of the belief that none of us is as smart as all of us.

It is going to be the most interesting decade ever. You heard it here first!

Disclosure: I have never been a huge proponent of blogging, as made transparent by this 2007 article.

Sunday, March 7, 2010

Microsoft Is "All In" for Cloud Computing

In the boxing ring of Enterprise IT, one of the heavyweights has now joined the fight. Because this was the week that Microsoft, with just six weeks to go before the 5th Cloud Expo, of which Microsoft is a Gold sponsor and one of the biggest exhibitors (out of over 70 leading Cloud companies exhibiting), came out of the corner swinging.

Specifically Microsoft's CEO, Steve Ballmer, gave a speech on Thursday to computer science students at the University of Washington. He discussed what’s ahead for computing, with a focus on how cloud computing will change the way people and businesses use technology.

"Twenty million businesses and over a billion people use Microsoft cloud services," Ballmer noted.

One of his slides in Seattle was headed:

"The cloud fuels Microsoft, and Microsoft fuels the cloud"

The most telling quote of all perhaps came towards the very end of his address. "This is the time," Ballmer said. "It's the opportunity and the cloud forms the basis between the microprocessor and the Internet, we did give the gifts that never stopped giving. And they're giving us the cloud today, and as I like to say at Microsoft, for the cloud we're all in."

Right after giving his speech, Ballmer sent an internal email to all Microsoft employees, the full text of which is worth reading since it gives chapter and verse on why Microsoft believes cloud computing to be one of the biggest opportunities in decades for the tech industry and for Microsoft. Here it is:

To: All Microsoft employees
From: Steve Ballmer

Today, I spoke to a group of students and faculty at the University of Washington to discuss how cloud computing will change the way people and businesses use technology.

My goal was to challenge people to look at the cloud more broadly and understand the multidimensional nature of the cloud transformation happening today. Other companies have defined the cloud in a narrow, one-dimensional way. Although these companies provide some interesting components, Microsoft is uniquely delivering on a wide range of cloud capabilities that bring increasingly more value to our customers.

In my speech, I outlined the five dimensions that define the way people use and realize value in the cloud:

* The cloud creates opportunities and responsibilities
* The cloud learns and helps you learn, decide and take action
* The cloud enhances your social and professional interactions
* The cloud wants smarter devices
* The cloud drives server advances that drive the cloud

This view fuels our investments across the entire company, from datacenters to cloud platform technologies to cloud-based development tools and applications. Today, nearly every one of our products has, or is developing, features or services that support the cloud. As I said today, when it comes to the cloud, we are all in. We are all in across every product line we have and across every dimension of the cloud.

Of course, this is not news to any of you. We have been making huge investments in the cloud for the past decade. Nearly five years ago, Ray's "Services Disruption" memo provided the outline for what we needed to do as a company, and with the delivery of Windows Azure at the recent PDC, we have made huge strides in making this vision real.

To keep our momentum, it is critical that every Microsoft employee works to deliver the full benefits of the cloud to our customers.

As a part of this, I request that you do the following:

* Watch the speech on demand here
* Learn more about our cloud offerings and how they relate to our overarching software plus services strategy here (unavailable outside Microsoft network)
* Review your commitments to ensure you are landing our vision with customers and partners.

Of course, there is more work to do. We have strong competitors. We need to be (and are) willing to change our business models to take advantage of the cloud. We must move at "cloud speed," especially in our consumer offerings. And we need to be crystal clear about the value we provide to all our customers.

To drive our message home even further, today you will see an ad campaign in the U.S. focused on our commercial and government businesses, a new website with consolidated content and case studies, and ongoing emphasis on the cloud from me and other members of the SLT in our upcoming speeches and presentations.

We have an enormous opportunity in front of us. We have great products and services in the market today and a range of new ones on their way.

All of our products make the cloud better, and the cloud makes our products better.


Anyone who wants to see how exactly all this is being translated into reality by Microsoft should make sure to attend 5th Cloud Expo at The Jacob Javits Convention Center next month (April 19-21, 2010). Microsoft's Azure services will have a prominent presence on the 3-day show floor, with a massive 25-foot by 25-foot booth that will leave no one in any doubt about Steve Ballmer's words. Microsoft truly is "all in" for the Cloud.

To borrow Ballmer's phrase, the event has grown at "Cloud speed" since we first produced it, in the heart of Silicon Valley, in 2008. It is currently trending to be The Lsrgest Cloud Computing Event in the World.

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Found: A Shining Beacon of Insight Among the Clouds

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whom most people know as an English poet, also wrote some very nice prose about words. For example he was the one who summed up poetry itself as being about, above all, choosing "the best possible words in the best possible order."

Another fellow who knew a thing or two about words was a predecessor of mine - by a few hundred years! - at Trinity College, Cambridge. His name was Archbishop Richard Chevenix Trench and he produced, among another things, a little volume call On The Study of Words. This was back in 1852.

At one point in this book, Trench is musing on the power of words and, in particular, the role that words play in paving the way for the public acceptance of ideas.

Some ideas, he notes, just don't seem to catch on until the right words are found to "nail" them down.

I was strongly reminded of Coleridge, and of Trench, when interviewing a technology CEO the other day about Cloud Computing. Because this particular CEO seemed to be a beacon of light amid the murky fog surrounding Cloud Computing. And what stuck in my mind particularly was his ability, just as Archbishop Trench noted, to "nail down" the essential value proposition of Cloud Computing.

One new term that he used and that struck me as particularly insightful was this: "Resource Cloud."

This term definitely resonates immediately with me as being one that will not just help, it will triumph. Instead of talking of hardware, of physical servers, what the world needs to do is think of there as existing a "Resource Cloud" in which providers of resources and consumers who use compute power are matched up.

"Those consumers don't need to know, and indeed don't care, where the resources are," said my CEO. "So let the providers with the hardware push it into the cloud while the consumers consume it by creating virtual machines."

He continued:

"'I need X terabytes of storage at this kind of performance level, let us say Grade A performance, and I need 30 CPU cores,' the consumer might say, and the providers will run the hardware necessary to supply that need. IT runs the hardware side, but it doesn't manage the virtual side. That is done by the customer at via their Virtual Data Center."

So this is his vision, the vision also known loosely as "Virtualization 2.0"

But to my ear, "Resource Cloud" is the stronger metaphor, with more likelihood of catching on. And in 21 days' time I will revisit this posting to add the name of the CEO concerned. He already has established himself as thought leader in the world of technology. I haven't a doubt that he will come very soon to be recognized too as the man who put datacenter virtualization on the map forever and for always with the introduction of this one colloquy: REsource Cloud."

What do you think? Is it the best term? Do you have a better one?